Toronto Biennial of Art

The Toronto Biennial of Art is a 72-day, free art exhibition located at 10 sites along the waterfront. The Small Arms Inspection Building will present works by 13 international artists and provide interactive experiences that include workshops, artist talks, community gatherings and explorative walks.

Admission to curated venues and outdoor installations is free and open to the public. Go to torontobiennial.org to find out more.

Opening BBQ and Workshops
Sunday, September 22, 2019 – 1:00pm to 5:00pm

You Are a Good Apple, Diane Borsato
Sunday, September 29, 2019 – 1:00pm to 4:00pm

Art Educator Information Evening
Wednesday, October 2, 2019 – 4:00pm to 6:00pm

Community Gathering 
Sunday, October 6, 2019 – 2:00pm to 5:00pm

Community Gathering
Sunday, October 13, 2019 – 2:00pm to 5:00pm

Lost Rivers Walk (starting at SAIB)
Sunday, October 27, 2019 – 1:00pm to 4:00pm

Ange Loft Workshop 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 – 2:00pm to 5:00pm

Talk Anastacia Marx Desalcedo 
Sunday, November 10, 2019 – 1:00pm to 4:00pm

Ange Loft Workshop
Sunday, November 14, 2019 – 2:00pm to 5:00pm

The Toronto Biennial of Art presents local, national, and international contemporary art. The event takes place every two years, offering accessible and transformative visual art exhibitions, installations, talks, learning opportunities, and happenings in new and unexpected spaces along the shores of Lake Ontario.

The Biennial’s goal is to galvanize Toronto and nearby cities, connecting communities around art and culture, and contributing to global conversations from a distinctly Canadian perspective. The event reflects the specific context of the region and its unique standard for inclusion and openness.

Public Hours: 
Wednesday to Monday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (closed Tuesdays)

Toronto Biennial of Art Information Session

The Toronto Biennial of Art is a 72 day art festival offering accessible and transformative visual art exhibitions, installations, talks, learning opportunities, and happenings in new and unexpected spaces along the shores of Lake Ontario. The Small Arms Inspection Building will be an important hub of activity for the festival. Over a dozen regional, national and international artists will present cross-disciplinary, site specific works at the SAIB. People will be coming from all over the world to participate and engage in the Toronto Biennial of Art. Admission to the Biennial is free and includes access to a series of programs that run in conjunction with installations.

Find out more! The Toronto Biennial will be hosting an information session on June 25 at the Small Arms Inspection Building at 7pm. All are welcome.

HABI Workshop 3: Indigenous Teachings with Philip Cote

Our Relationship with the Land

HABI: Weaving Stories of Migrant Labour & Indigenous Resurgence is a free public programming series by Kwentong Bayan Collective.

This project explores the inaugural convergence of National Indigenous People’s month and the newly announced, National Filipino Heritage Month in June 2019.

In the Filipino language, “habi” means “weave” – referring to the practice of weaving, or the patterns found in woven materials. HABI is also the process by which something is kept together and made whole.

This month-long public programming series will feature three community arts workshops exploring Indigenous history, labour, migration, and our relationship with the land.

All programs are FREE and will be offered at the Small Arms Inspection Building (SAIB) located on the Treaty Lands and Territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation along Lake Ontario’s eastern waterfront.

Event info:

National Indigenous Peoples Day is celebrated on June 21 across Canada/Turtle Island. It also coincides with the summer solstice, the longest day of the year, and a time for traditional gatherings and ceremonies.

We will gather in a community learning circle, led by Philip Cote (Artist, Activist, Historian, Traditional Wisdom Keeper and Young Elder). We will learn about the Indigenous history of this land, healing plant medicines and the practice of smudging, and stories connected to summer solstice. Weather permitting, we will engage in outdoor activities, using the paved pathways surrounding the SAIB for accessibility.

A free community meal & artist talk by Kwentong Bayan to celebrate the summer solstice will commence at noon. Philip Cote’s sharing is from 1-4pm.

The SAIB is an accessible venue with single-user, all-gender washrooms available.

Image courtesy of Philip Cote, “Old Mill Grandmother Moon
(Underneath Old Mill Station, King’s Mill Park, 2017”)

https://tecumsehcollective.wixsite.com/philipcote

HABI Workshop 2: Community Art Build with Migrant Care Workers

HABI: Weaving Stories of Migrant Labour & Indigenous Resurgence is a free public programming series by Kwentong Bayan Collective.

This project explores the inaugural convergence of National Indigenous People’s month and the newly announced, National Filipino Heritage Month in June 2019.

In the Filipino language, “habi” means “weave” – referring to the practice of weaving, or the patterns found in woven materials. HABI is also the process by which something is kept together and made whole.

This month-long public programming series will feature three community arts workshops exploring Indigenous history, labour, migration, and our relationship with the land.

All programs are FREE and will be offered at the Small Arms Inspection Building (SAIB) located on the Treaty Lands and Territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation along Lake Ontario’s eastern waterfront.

Event info:

In collaboration with Caregiver Connections, Education and Support Organization (Cceso Cceso), migrant caregivers/care workers will share their lived experiences and some of the urgent issues affecting their lives today, including the Migrant Justice Campaign that responds to the federal government’s plan to eliminate the pathway to Permanent Residency for migrant workers as of November 2019.

Kwentong Bayan will facilitate a Community Art Build on the topic of Community Care, including labour and migrant rights, solidarity with Indigenous land and water protectors, and disability justice and 2SLGBTIQQ* activism.

Art materials will be provided. Participants are encouraged to bring ideas and images for banners and placards that they can use at community actions.

FREE, no registration required. The SAIB is an accessible venue with single-user, all-gender washrooms available. Refreshments provided. Child-friendly space.

Image courtesy of CCESO & CAC, IWD 2019

HABI Workshop 1: Ways of Weaving

Zero-Waste. Sustainable. Indigenous.

HABI: Weaving Stories of Migrant Labour & Indigenous Resurgence is a free public programming series by Kwentong Bayan Collective.

This project explores the inaugural convergence of National Indigenous People’s month and the newly announced, National Filipino Heritage Month in June 2019.

In the Filipino language, “habi” means “weave” – referring to the practice of weaving, or the patterns found in woven materials. HABI is also the process by which something is kept together and made whole.

This month-long public programming series will feature three community arts workshops exploring Indigenous history, labour, migration, and our relationship with the land.

All programs are FREE and will be offered at the Small Arms Inspection Building (SAIB) located on the Treaty Lands and Territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation along Lake Ontario’s eastern waterfront.

Event info:

Guest artists, Cynthia Alberto (Weaving Hand, NYC) will introduce the concept of zero-waste weaving and how sustainable weaving practices can benefit the environment.

Maria Montejo (Jakaltec/Popti) will share stories of Mayan weaving practices. Kwentong Bayan and Kapwa Collective will share indigenous weaving practices of the Philippines.

Participants will learn how to use custom backstrap looms that can be used while sitting on the ground, standing, or sitting in a chair.

Weaving materials will be provided, but we ask participants to bring their own recyclable and fabric-based items like plastic or paper bags, donated clothing, ribbon, yarn, string, and personal items that they would like to weave into their zero-waste projects.

This workshop is limited to 30 participants. You must register to reserve your spot on Eventbrite.

The SAIB is an accessible venue with single-user, all-gender washrooms available. Refreshments provided. Child-friendly space.

Image courtesy of Kapwa Collective, photo by Eloisa Guerrero

re: placement, can we find a way?

CONSENT IS, Aidan Cowling, Marina Fathalla, Thompson Nguyen, Aislinn Thomas, Khanh Tudo, QTBIPOC sauga, Alize Zorlutuna

April to July 2019
Curated by Anu Radha Verma

Upcoming Event:

June 1 – 12:00pm to 3:00pm
Small Arms Inspection Building

We Can Find A Way: QTBIPOC artists
Featuring
Qurat Dar
Hana Shafi (Frizz Kid) Hana Sh
Screening of HARD TO LOVE by Chloe Kirlew & Tiana Smith

Barrier-free space. All gender washroom. Refreshments provided.
If you require any support with getting to the venue, please contact Anu Radha Verma: aradhaverma@gmail.com

Join us on Saturday, June 1st for the second installment of We can find a way, as part of re: placement, can we find a way? a public programming series curated by Anu Radha Verma.

We can find a way celebrates the ways in which QTBIPOC artists take (up) space through brilliance and resilience. This space-taking is especially important in the face of exclusion and erasure. At this 2nd installment of the event, we’ll feature artists Qurat Dar, Hana Shafi (Frizz Kid), and a special screening of HARD TO LOVE by Chloe Kirlew and Tiana Smith. This event is a collaboration with QTBIPOC sauga, a grassroots gathering of queer and trans, Black, Indigenous and people of colour communities in Peel.

Full program details:

re:placement, can we find a way?

CONSENT IS, Aidan Cowling, Marina Fathalla, Thompson Nguyen, Aislinn Thomas, Khanh Tudo, QTBIPOC sauga, Alize Zorlutuna

April to July 2019
Curated by Anu Radha Verma

“I cannot walk through the suburbs in the solitude of the night without thinking that the night pleases us because it suppresses idle details, just as our memory does.”
– Jorge Luis Borges

Mississauga is a place of complexities: pasts that scream to be recognized or remembered; futures that seem contrary to the constant push of “development” marked by towers, malls and claims of diversity; and presents/presence of demands that can be traced along the fractured lines of roads, boundaries and barriers. These complexities run parallel to the simple almost-comic depictions of what the suburbs are: bedroom communities, conservative bastions where nothing interesting or political happens, wannabe places decades “behind” their big city siblings.

How do space, place and “justice” make themselves known, or felt in this suburban landscape?

re: placement, can we find a way? is a set of public programs intended to confront (some of) the complexities of Mississauga. Curated by Anu Radha Verma, re: placement, can we find a way? features artists across disciplines, who each offer up a meditation on these suburbs by interrogating place, space, access, meaning, community and connection.

April 26 – 6:00pm to 9:00pm
Small Arms Inspection Building

6:30pm – Launch of public programming, as well as curator chai and chat
7:00pm –We Can Find a Way: QTBIPOC performances (feat. Manghoe Lassi, Tifa Wine, Saadia Khan, Ro, and Sharan Dhaliwal), in collaboration with QTBIPOC sauga

May 4 – 1:00 pm to 4:00pm
Small Arms Inspection Building

1:00pm – Anonymous Aesthetics with Aidan Cowling
2:30pm – Leaving the table: How to draw an imagined place with Alize Zorlutuna

May 11 – 1:00pm to 3:30pm
Sheridan Branch Library, Meeting Room

Counter-narrative to the dissolution of Sheridan Centre with Marina Fathalla

May 18 – 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Dixie Outlet Mall

Fast and Slow Walkers of Dixie Mall with Aislinn Thomas

May 23 – 6:00pm to 9:00pm
Mississauga Central Library, Classroom 2 

Retracing Queer Suburbia with Thompson Nguyen
This event is for queer and trans, Black, Indigenous and people of colour to attend

June 1 – 12:00pm to 3:00pm
Small Arms Inspection Building

We Can Find a Way: QTBIPOC artists (feat. screening of HARD TO LOVE by Chloe Kirlew and Tiana Smith), in collaboration with QTBIPOC sauga

July 8 to 10
Location forthcoming

Public education and artist talk with CONSENT IS

July 27 – 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Small Arms Inspection Building

Gentle Durian and artist talk with Khanh Tudo

All programs are FREE of charge.

re: placement, can we find a way? is part of Public Volumes, a multi-sited project that brings together exhibitions, public programming and writing that centre around broad interpretations of spatial justice. Public Volumes is curated by Noa Bronstein.

Image caption: Anu Radha Verma, ache + wait for transit, 2015.

Public Volumes

Exhibition from April 6 to May 5

Exhibition continues at Bradley Museum and Mississauga City Hall

Artists:
Joi T. Arcand
Cathy Busby
soJin Chun
Stephanie Comilang
Sheena Hoszko
Germaine Koh
HaeAhn Paul Kwon Kajander
Morris Lum
Dawit L. Petros
jes sachse
Kara Springer
LeuWebb
Amanda White

Curated by: Noa Bronstein

Public Volumes brings together exhibitions, public programming and writing that centre around broad interpretations of spatial justice. These many projects focus in or out from a particular location or series of locations, fostering deeper insight into why space matters. From thinking through ideas around memory and ways of living to community mobilization and immigration, Public Volumes espouses the multiple meanings folded into the spaces of everyday life and those of unexpected circumstance. This program looks to the tangled means by which we defend the spaces that offer support and the efforts we take to transform those that fail.

Taking place over three sites within Mississauga and featuring collaborations with Koffler.Digital and independent curator Anu Radha Verma, Public Volumes features existing and newly commissioned work from artists working across a range of media.

We are pleased to announce that as part of Public Volumes we will be presenting new and site-specific work at Bradley Museum by soJin Chun and LeuWebb Projects.

FREE Contemporary Art Bus Tour: April 6, 2019 – 11:45am to 4:45pm
Pick-up and drop-off at Kipling Station
Features visits at Humber Galleries, Art Gallery of Mississauga, and SAIB

Public Volumes Bus Tour: April 13, 2019 – 12:30pm to 4:30pm 
Pick-up and drop-off at the Gladstone Hotel
Features tours of SAIB, Bradley Museum and City Hall with artists HaeAhn Paul Kwon Kajander, Amanda White, soJin Chun and LeuWebb Projects.

Morphology

Witness the birth of a new landscape through photography.

Seen through the eyes of 11 creative photo artists, we can explore our relationship and connection with water, landscapes, and our shared responsibility to the Great Lakes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2-3roKcfKs

Visit cvc.ca/morphology for more information

Dates:
Saturday, March 23, noon – 9 pm
Sunday, March 24, 9 am – 5 pm

2167: An Indigenous VR Project

Works by Danis Goulet, Kent Monkman, Scott Benesiinaabandan, and Postcommodity

ImagineNATIVE in partnership with TIFF, Pinnuaq, and the Initiative for Indigenous Futures (IIF), present 2167, an innovative virtual reality and immersive media project. Five Indigenous filmmakers and artists have been commissioned to create five VR works in 2017, with each artist asked to set their work 150 years in the future.

The idea for this project was born out of a love of science fiction and alternate realities. Often Indigenous people are seen as stuck in the past; the 2167 project takes a very deliberate leap forward in time and we get to see artistic visions about Indigenous place in the future. In a year that in many ways commemorates a very complex history for Indigenous people, this project celebrates the decades to come and our role in shaping a new future for Canada.

Presented in the context of Amy Malbeuf’s exhibition, tensions, at the Small Arms Inspection Building, January 5 to February 9, 2019.

Supported by:

tensions

Exhibition Dates: January 5 to February 9, 2019
Exhibition hours: Wednesday to Saturday, 12-4pm

Amy Malbeuf presents a body of work that considers multiple manifestations of tension – the physical act of stretching or straining; the state of being stretched or strained; and the mental and emotional consequences brought by trauma such as intense stress, anxiety and avoidance. The multidisciplinary work in tensions is centred around tarps, objects that are utilitarian, practical, and a necessity, but through Malbeuf’s intervention the tarps become symbolic and functional – on one hand serving as tools for rural, utilitarian pursuits and necessities of life, while on the other, in the hands of Malbeuf, the tarps become cultural markers, drawing from the artist’s personal, familial, cultural and environmental relationships. This is enacted through the integration of familial objects – beaded gun cases and fur stretchers – alongside bison hides and caribou hair tufting. In doing so, Malbeuf charges these objects with an inextricable connection to the land, and a kinship to her Metis heritage and cultural identity.

Amy Malbeuf is a Metis visual artist from Rich Lake, Alberta. Through utilizing mediums such as caribou hair tufting, beadwork, installation, performance, and video Malbeuf explores notions of identity, place, language, and ecology. She has exhibited her work nationally and internationally in over forty shows at such venues as Art Mur, Montreal, Winnipeg Art Gallery; Art Gallery of Alberta, Edmonton; Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe; and Pataka Art + Museum, Porirua, New Zealand. Malbeuf has participated in many international artist residencies including at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, (AUS); The Banff Centre; The Labrador Research Institute; and Santa Fe Art Institute (US). She holds a MFA in Visual Art from the University of British Columbia Okanagan. Malbeuf has been the recipient of such honours as the 2016 Lieutenant Governor of Alberta Emerging Artist Award, the 2016 William and Meredith Saunderson Prize for Emerging Artists in Canada from the Hnatyshyn Foundation, a 2017 REVEAL award from the Hnatyshyn Foundation and was long listed for the 2017 Sobey Art Award.

Image: Amy Malbeuf, tensions, installation view at Artspace, Peterborough.
Photo: Matthew Hayes