All about Bats

Join us for a night of adventure as you take in a presentation on bats and why they are important in our communities.

Afterwards, hike into the woods as citizen scientists by listening to the world of bats through a special bat detector. This program is recommended for families with children over the age of 6.

  • Hike Distance: 3 km
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Surface Type: Crushed limestone and pavement
  • Age Range: Family Friendly
  • Meeting Place: Inside the Small Arms Inspection Building for a fun presentation

Washrooms are available on site. This event will take place rain or shine. Please dress for the weather, including closed-toed shoes and sun/rain protection. You will be notified if the hike needs to be cancelled due to extreme weather.

TRCA is committed to creating an accessible experience for all participants. If you require an accommodation, please email stephanie.parish@trca.ca at least 7 days prior to the event.

Register now

Building Together to Close the Dream Gap

Presented by Barbie and Girls Can Too

Join us for an interactive building workshop with Barbie and Girls Can Too. You will get tool safety tips, a chance to build your own garden box or bird house, participate in a scavenger hunt with fun prizes and meet Marissa McTasney, Founder/CEO of Moxie Trades and one of the Barbie’s role models, during a catered Lunch n’ Learn presentation.

This is a free event but registration is required. This program is suitable for girls in grades 1 to 4. Children must be accompanied by an adult (maximum 2 children per guardian please).

TRCA is committed to creating an accessible experience for all participants. If you require an accommodation, please email jennifer.ouimette@trca.ca at least 7 days prior to the event.

This event is offered in partnership with Mattel Canada Inc.

HABI Workshop 3: Indigenous Teachings with Philip Cote

Our Relationship with the Land

HABI: Weaving Stories of Migrant Labour & Indigenous Resurgence is a free public programming series by Kwentong Bayan Collective.

This project explores the inaugural convergence of National Indigenous People’s month and the newly announced, National Filipino Heritage Month in June 2019.

In the Filipino language, “habi” means “weave” – referring to the practice of weaving, or the patterns found in woven materials. HABI is also the process by which something is kept together and made whole.

This month-long public programming series will feature three community arts workshops exploring Indigenous history, labour, migration, and our relationship with the land.

All programs are FREE and will be offered at the Small Arms Inspection Building (SAIB) located on the Treaty Lands and Territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation along Lake Ontario’s eastern waterfront.

Event info:

National Indigenous Peoples Day is celebrated on June 21 across Canada/Turtle Island. It also coincides with the summer solstice, the longest day of the year, and a time for traditional gatherings and ceremonies.

We will gather in a community learning circle, led by Philip Cote (Artist, Activist, Historian, Traditional Wisdom Keeper and Young Elder). We will learn about the Indigenous history of this land, healing plant medicines and the practice of smudging, and stories connected to summer solstice. Weather permitting, we will engage in outdoor activities, using the paved pathways surrounding the SAIB for accessibility.

A free community meal & artist talk by Kwentong Bayan to celebrate the summer solstice will commence at noon. Philip Cote’s sharing is from 1-4pm.

The SAIB is an accessible venue with single-user, all-gender washrooms available.

Image courtesy of Philip Cote, “Old Mill Grandmother Moon
(Underneath Old Mill Station, King’s Mill Park, 2017”)

https://tecumsehcollective.wixsite.com/philipcote

HABI Workshop 2: Community Art Build with Migrant Care Workers

HABI: Weaving Stories of Migrant Labour & Indigenous Resurgence is a free public programming series by Kwentong Bayan Collective.

This project explores the inaugural convergence of National Indigenous People’s month and the newly announced, National Filipino Heritage Month in June 2019.

In the Filipino language, “habi” means “weave” – referring to the practice of weaving, or the patterns found in woven materials. HABI is also the process by which something is kept together and made whole.

This month-long public programming series will feature three community arts workshops exploring Indigenous history, labour, migration, and our relationship with the land.

All programs are FREE and will be offered at the Small Arms Inspection Building (SAIB) located on the Treaty Lands and Territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation along Lake Ontario’s eastern waterfront.

Event info:

In collaboration with Caregiver Connections, Education and Support Organization (Cceso Cceso), migrant caregivers/care workers will share their lived experiences and some of the urgent issues affecting their lives today, including the Migrant Justice Campaign that responds to the federal government’s plan to eliminate the pathway to Permanent Residency for migrant workers as of November 2019.

Kwentong Bayan will facilitate a Community Art Build on the topic of Community Care, including labour and migrant rights, solidarity with Indigenous land and water protectors, and disability justice and 2SLGBTIQQ* activism.

Art materials will be provided. Participants are encouraged to bring ideas and images for banners and placards that they can use at community actions.

FREE, no registration required. The SAIB is an accessible venue with single-user, all-gender washrooms available. Refreshments provided. Child-friendly space.

Image courtesy of CCESO & CAC, IWD 2019

HABI Workshop 1: Ways of Weaving

Zero-Waste. Sustainable. Indigenous.

HABI: Weaving Stories of Migrant Labour & Indigenous Resurgence is a free public programming series by Kwentong Bayan Collective.

This project explores the inaugural convergence of National Indigenous People’s month and the newly announced, National Filipino Heritage Month in June 2019.

In the Filipino language, “habi” means “weave” – referring to the practice of weaving, or the patterns found in woven materials. HABI is also the process by which something is kept together and made whole.

This month-long public programming series will feature three community arts workshops exploring Indigenous history, labour, migration, and our relationship with the land.

All programs are FREE and will be offered at the Small Arms Inspection Building (SAIB) located on the Treaty Lands and Territory of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation along Lake Ontario’s eastern waterfront.

Event info:

Guest artists, Cynthia Alberto (Weaving Hand, NYC) will introduce the concept of zero-waste weaving and how sustainable weaving practices can benefit the environment.

Maria Montejo (Jakaltec/Popti) will share stories of Mayan weaving practices. Kwentong Bayan and Kapwa Collective will share indigenous weaving practices of the Philippines.

Participants will learn how to use custom backstrap looms that can be used while sitting on the ground, standing, or sitting in a chair.

Weaving materials will be provided, but we ask participants to bring their own recyclable and fabric-based items like plastic or paper bags, donated clothing, ribbon, yarn, string, and personal items that they would like to weave into their zero-waste projects.

This workshop is limited to 30 participants. You must register to reserve your spot on Eventbrite.

The SAIB is an accessible venue with single-user, all-gender washrooms available. Refreshments provided. Child-friendly space.

Image courtesy of Kapwa Collective, photo by Eloisa Guerrero

Poetry and Calligraphy Workshop

Join us on March 16 & 17 from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm for a poetry and calligraphy workshop led by poet Laboni Islam and artist Soheila K. Esfahani.

This two-day workshop is focused on supporting inter-generational dialogue through creative writing and art-making. The workshop is uniquely designed to encourage participants of different generations to work together to create something new through text and image. Participants will use storytelling and self-expression to consider themes of emigration, immigration, migration, culture and memory.

In this workshop you will have the chance to:

  • Read and write poetry through participatory and directed writing exercises
  • Use traditional reed pens and ink to explore the possibilities of Islamic calligraphy (prior knowledge of the language or calligraphy is not necessary)
  • Create independently and collaboratively with other participants

You’ll leave your own with poetry and calligraphy art!

For the workshop, please bring with you an image or object that you associate with your culture – we encourage you to interpret culture openly and in ways that are important to you!

Please note:

  • This is a multi-generational workshop, designed for adults and children, age 11+
  • All children must co-register with an adult caregiver
  • This is a two-day workshop, attending both sessions is highly recommended

This workshop is FREE but space is limited, so please register through the Museums of Mississauga by phone 905-615-4860 or email at museums@mississauga.ca.

Artist Bios:

Laboni Islam was born in Canada to Bangladeshi parents. She fondly remembers living, working, and going to the library in Mississauga. Her poem “Lunar Landing, 1966” was shortlisted for the CBC Poetry Prize (2017). Her poetry has been anthologized in The Unpublished City (Book*hug, 2017), which was shortlisted for the Toronto Book Awards (2018). Currently, she leads tours and art-making sessions at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Aga Khan Museum for young audiences, Kindergarten through Grade 12.

Soheila K. Esfahani grew up in Tehran, Iran, and moved to Canada in 1992. She is an award-winning visual artist and recipient of numerous grants. Her work has been exhibited across Canada from Vancouver to Halifax and collected by various public and private institutions, including the Canada Council’s Art Bank. She is a lecturer at the University of Waterloo and a member of the Red Head Gallery.

Bicycle Friendly Communities Workshop

The City of Mississauga Active Transportation Office is pleased to be working with the Share the Road Cycling Coalition to host a Bicycle Friendly Communities Workshop.

About this Event
In this interactive, full-day Workshop on Thursday, March 7, 2019 from 9:30 am to 3:00 pm attendees will:

  • Gain an understanding of the of the Bicycle Friendly Communities process.
  • Explore Mississauga’s existing cycling assets and programs related to education, encouragement, enforcement, and evaluation & planning.
  • Learn about what communities similar to Mississauga have done to make themselves better places for people on bikes.
  • Create a short-term, action-oriented work plan to help Mississauga become more bicycle friendly.
  • Build new connections with other stakeholders to ensure that the resulting work plan becomes a reality.

Workshop Agenda
9:30 am — Networking and Registration
10:00 am — Introductions and Workshop Overview
10:15 am — Taking Stock
11:00 am — Visioning
12:00 pm — Working Lunch
1:00 pm — Project Building
2:45 pm — Next Steps

Register Here:
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/bicycle-friendly-communities-workshop-tickets-55426000660

For more information email cycling@mississauga.ca

Tracing Mississauga

Throughout 2019, artist Hiba Abdallah will lead a series of collaborative workshops, discussions, projects and interventions that trace our collective food memory. We will consider the commemoration of place through walking, discussing and eating together. One of the aims of the project will be to bring an acute awareness to the multiple communities who are present in Mississauga, and the histories of immigration and colonialism that have shaped the city through food.

This mapping session will consider how/when/where/what food is located in Mississauga. Collectively we will trace and plot the different cuisines, shops and homes that compose the food palette of the city.

Presented in the context of Amy Malbeuf’s exhibition, tensions, at the Small Arms Inspection Building, January 5 to February 9, 2019.

Image: Hiba Abdallah in collaboration with Justin Langlois, EVERYTHING IS HAPPENING RIGHT HERE, Calder Plaza, Grand Rapids, MI, 2017

Traditional Bone Bead Workshop

Presented in partnership with the Peel Aboriginal Network

Join us for a beading workshop led by Tabitha Shurgold of the Peel Aboriginal Network. This walk-in workshop will be suitable for all ages and skill levels.

Traditional Beading has been a part of the Indigenous traditions and culture for centuries. Indigenous cultural traditions teach us to use every part of the animal, to not waste anything. The animal’s hide and bones are used to create jewelry and regalia.

Presented in the context of Amy Malbeuf’s exhibition, tensions, at the Small Arms Inspection Building, January 5 to February 9, 2019.

Image: Amy Malbeuf, Woodland Camo, detail, 2017. Tarp, beadwork, inherited objects (gun case), 90″ x 110″
Photo: Matthew Hayes